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This could be your home.

6ringbit-entry

6 Ringbit Road West, Rolling Hills, California

  • 5,664 sq. ft.
  • 6 bedrooms
  • panoramic view of the southern California sky over the Pacific Ocean
  • elegant entry way
  • much, much more….

6ringbit-kitchen-view

Learn more about this exquisite Rolling Hills home located on a cul-de-sac on Ringbit Road. Call Clint Patterson at 310.426.8811 or Leslie Stetson at 310.936.1283 for more information and a private viewing of this exquisite, spacious home sitting on roughly 3 acres of private, secluded land. And this is a gated, equestrian community.

Go to our property site for more photographs, and information about this Rolling Hills home on sale.

Virtual Tour:

Choosing Patio Stones

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With so many patio stones on the market, it can be hard to choose. So we’ve done the research to help you make the right choice for your home.

Brick

Brick pavers are classic. They’ve got lots of character, and you can explore your creative chops by setting them in intricate patterns. Thinner than typical “builder bricks” used on home siding, they’re made to hold up under heavy foot traffic.
Brick pavers come in a variety of shapes, sizes, colors, and finishes, and can look old or new. Because they’re smaller than other pavers, they take a while to put in place, and installation costs can be higher.

You can do the job yourself for $3 to $5 per square foot. You’ll need to rent a brick saw — a heavy table-mounted saw that makes cutting masonry a snap. Cost: $60 to $95 per day. Don’t forget: You’ll need to figure out a way to get the brick saw to your house.

For a pro-installed brick patio, you’ll pay $12 to $18 per square foot, professionally installed.

Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Concrete

Concrete can be finished off in lots of imaginative ways — brushed, acid washed, scored, and stamped — and lots of colors. Its long lifespan and relatively inexpensive installation make it a popular choice.

“For colder climates, consider adding $1 to $2 per square foot for a specialized base preparation and concrete additive,” says Chris Fenmore, principal with Garden Studio Landscape Design.

Stamped concrete can simulate flagstone, brick, cobbles, and other decorative patterns, but adds about $3 per square foot to installation costs.

Figure $6 to 12 per square foot, depending on finish and color.

Brick
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Concrete Pavers

Concrete pavers offer an embarrassment of riches — there are shapes, sizes, textures, and colors galore. Some are plain; some look like real stone; others have intricate patterns embossed on their surfaces. They’re readily available at home improvement centers and are well-suited to DIY patio projects.

Interlocking concrete pavers have tabs and slots so they fit together like pieces of a very simple puzzle. They’re fairly inexpensive, have minimal maintenance, and install quickly.

Concrete pavers are $2 to $8 per square foot. If you’d rather have a pro do it, you’ll pay $7 to $15 per square foot, including materials.

Brick
Concrete
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Rubber Tiles
Rubber tiles are made from recycled tires. They’re designed to go over any surface, and their light weight means you can use them on decks. They look like concrete tiles, with finishes that resemble brick and terra cotta. They’re fairly new on the market, so the jury is still out on how they perform over time.

Rubber tiles are strictly a DIY material, and they snap together with connector clips. They’re good for quickly covering up old, cracked, worn patio surfaces. You’ll pay $3 to $5 per square foot.

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Flagstone, Slate, and Marble

Almost any stone can work as a paver, but most are either sandstone, limestone, slate, or granite. The materials you select will be especially cost-efficient if they come from locally operated quarries; check your local stone supplier before looking at national home improvement chains.

Stone pavers are cut into modular shapes; 6-by-12, 12-by-12, and 18-by-18-inch sizes are standard. Uncut pavers have rough, irregular edges and come in various sizes.

When it comes to installing uncut stone, an experienced pro works quickly and is your best bet for a good-looking patio with even spaces between stones.

Pro installation is $12 to $28 per square foot, depending on the stone you choose.

Want to see some stone patios that really rock?

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces

Decomposed granite is made up of very small pieces of granite, ranging in size from 1/4-inch to the size of sand. It’s an affordable way to go, and some folks really love the slightly crunchy texture underfoot, and the way rain disappears — no puddles!

You’ll probably have to refresh and replenish the granite now and then, as the surface can erode with time, so there’s some preventative maintenance involved. Figure about $1 per square foot every three years for upkeep.

Also, decomposed granite isn’t solid and furniture legs tend to sink into the stones. Adding stabilizers that help bind particles together can strengthen the surface.

Cost: $1.50 per square foot without stabilizers, $2 with stabilizers.

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Finding Your Own Recycled Materials

Like the idea of upcycling? A patio is a good way to reuse old building materials, and it’s a cost-effective and eco-friendly alternative to new materials. Plus, you’ll be building a one-of-a-kind creation. Tip: Look for materials that provide uniform thickness.
Cast-off concrete sections from a neighbor’s old driveway or sidewalk.
Check nearby construction sites for old materials — be sure to ask permission before hauling anything away.
Know of a building scheduled for demolition? See if there’s any old brick or stone is going to be discarded.
Although the materials are usually free, it’s a good idea to enlist some strong-backed helpers and the use of a pick-up truck. For a typical 12-by-12-foot patio, you’ll save $500 to $800 versus new pavers. Spend some of that on a patio party for your helpers.

(If you’re a salvaged materials aficionado, check out our slideshow on clever ways to use salvage in your home.)

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Mixing Materials
Getting on Base

Mixing Materials

Remember, you’re not stuck with one type of patio paver. Combining different materials — such as brick together with concrete, or stone with rock trim, can create a cool, customized look.

Southern California designer Chris Fenmore notes, “Too much hardscape can be tedious. I often like to use four-inch troughs separating masonry from concrete that can be filled with gravel, beach rocks, or ground cover. They provide a bit of relief from the hardscape and nice detail, adding to the custom look of the yard.”

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials

Getting on Base

Choosing paving materials begins with a basic: the base or foundation. The base supports your pavers, and it’s got to be firm, strong, and designed to stand up to years of wear and weather. A poorly installed base leads to shifting and settling that’ll crack concrete and make your patio pavers look like choppy seas.

A sand-and-gravel base is a good DIY project; leave a concrete slab base to the pros.

A gravel and sand base is a simple foundation that lets you “dry set” pavers — you put the pavers on top of the base, then sweep fine sand into the joints to hold them there. Building a gravel-and-sand base is an easy (but time-consuming) DIY project. You’ll pay $2 to $3 per square foot for a DIY job. If you’d rather have a pro do the work, figure $3 to $5 per square foot.

With a sand or gravel base, chances are there’ll be some settling over time. Every couple of years, plan on resetting individual pavers that have gotten out of whack because of settling.

A concrete base offers greater longevity and stability, with less potential for settling. On a concrete slab base, the paving materials are set permanently with mortar, and ongoing maintenance is minimal.

Working with concrete is a challenge for weekend warriors, so skip experimentation (mistakes in concrete are permanent) and go with a pro. You’ll pay $5 to $8 per square foot for a professionally installed concrete base.

If you’re a fan of concrete, check out these imaginative ways to use concrete inside your house.

Brick
Concrete
Concrete Pavers
Rubber Tiles
Flagstone, Slate, and Marble
Decomposed Granite and Pebble Surfaces
Finding Your Own Recycled Materials
Mixing Materials

By: Andrea Nordstrom Caughey on houselogic.com

How to Use Comparable Sales to Price Your Home

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Before you put your home up for sale, understand how the right comparable sales help you and your agent find the perfect price.
How much can you sell your home for? Probably about as much as the neighbors got, as long as the neighbors sold their house in recent memory and their home was just like your home.

Knowing how much homes similar to yours, called comparable sales (or in real estate lingo, comps), sold for gives you the best idea of the current estimated value of your home. The trick is finding sales that closely match yours.
What makes a good comparable sale?

Your best comparable sale is the same model as your house in the same subdivision—and it closed escrow last week. If you can’t find that, here are other factors that count:

  • Location: The closer to your house the better, but don’t just use any comparable sale within a mile radius. A good comparable sale is a house in your neighborhood, your subdivision, on the same type of street as your house, and in your school district.
  • Home type: Try to find comparable sales that are like your home in style, construction material, square footage, number of bedrooms and baths, basement (having one and whether it’s finished), finishes, and yard size.
  • Amenities and upgrades: Is the kitchen new? Does the comparable sale house have full A/C? Is there crown molding, a deck, or a pool? Does your community have the same amenities (pool, workout room, walking trails, etc.) and homeowners association fees?
  • Date of sale: You may want to use a comparable sale from two years ago when the market was high, but that won’t fly. Most buyers use government-guaranteed mortgages, and those lending programs say comparable sales can be no older than 90 days.
  • Sales sweeteners: Did the comparable-sale sellers give the buyers downpayment assistance, closing costs, or a free television? You have to reduce the value of any comparable sale to account for any deal sweeteners.
    Agents can help adjust price based on insider insights
    Even if you live in a subdivision, your home will always be different from your neighbors’. Evaluating those differences—like the fact that your home has one more bedroom than the comparables or a basement office—is one of the ways real estate agents add value.

An active agent has been inside a lot of homes in your neighborhood and knows all sorts of details about comparable sales. She has read the comments the selling agent put into the MLS, seen the ugly wallpaper, and heard what other REALTORS®, lenders, closing agents, and appraisers said about the comparable sale.

More ways to pick a home listing price

If you’re still having trouble picking out a listing price for your home, look at the current competition. Ask your real estate agent to be honest about your home and the other homes on the market (and then listen to her without taking the criticism personally).

Next, put your comparable sales into two piles: more expensive and less expensive. What makes your home more valuable than the cheaper comparable sales and less valuable than the pricier comparable sales?

Are foreclosures and short sales comparables?
If one or more of your comparable sales was a foreclosed home or a short sale (a home that sold for less money than the owners owed on the mortgage), ask your real estate agent how to treat those comps.

A foreclosed home is usually in poor condition because owners who can’t pay their mortgage can’t afford to pay for upkeep. Your home is in great shape, so the foreclosure should be priced lower than your home.

Short sales are typically in good condition, although they are still distressed sales. The owners usually have to sell because they’re divorcing, or their employer is moving them to Kansas.

How much short sales are discounted from their market value varies among local markets. The average short-sale home in Omaha in recent years was discounted by 8.5%, according to a University of Nebraska at Omaha study. In suburban Washington, D.C., sellers typically discount short-sale homes by 3% to 5% to get them quickly sold, real estate agents report. In other markets, sellers price short sales the same as other homes in the neighborhood.

So you have to rely on your real estate agent’s knowledge of the local market to use a short sale as a comparable sale.

By: Carl Vogel | HouseLogic

In Palos Verdes? Call Clint Patterson for your real estate questions. (310) 426-8811

6 Bedroom Rolling Hills Home on Promontory

6 Ringbit Road W, Rolling Hills, CA

Exquisite home on promontory overlooking Pacific Ocean, Channel Islands, canyons and city lights of Rancho Palos Verdes. Completed in 2003, this property features the finest finishes and attention to detail.

The upper level includes the chef’s kitchen with premium appliances, extensive granite counters, custom cupboards and hardwood floors. There are huge windows overlooking the ocean. The kitchen connects to the Great Room which has an elegant marble fireplace and french doors leading to the covered patio with views of the Pacific and canyons. The formal dining room is bright and airy, with direct access to a peaceful courtyard. The formal living room features another gorgeous fireplace and breathtaking views of the ocean and rolling hills. The master suite features French doors, views of the Pacific, its own fireplace, large walk in closet and a spa-like bathroom. There are four more bedrooms on the main level – 3 are en suite with their own bathrooms.

On the lower level you’ll find a huge media/family room with an elegant natural stone bar, another en-suite bedroom, plus an additional bedroom/den, 1/2 bath, laundry and utility room.

The property includes roughly 3 acres of private, secluded land with room for orchards or vineyards.

Located in the private, 24 hour guard gated City of Rolling Hills on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. This home was custom built – taking 4 years to complete. See it to appreciate it!

PRICE EXCLUDES: black glass chandelier and sconces from nursery

PRICE INCLUDES: all appliances and window treatments; access to 50+ miles of equestrian/hiking trails as well as 3 community tennis courts.

FEATURES LIST

  • Ranch style
  • 6 bedrooms
  • 7 baths (5 full 2 half)
  • Guest/Maid’s quarters
  • Copper plumbing
  • Crown moulding
  • 5,664 sq. ft.
  • 3 car attached garage
  • Built 2003
  • Located on cul-de-sac
  • Serenity and privacy
  • Premiere address in equestrian, gated city

Please see property brochure for comprehensive list of additional features. This home is shown by appointment only. Please call 310.936.1283 or 310.426.8811 to arrange a showing. Thank you.

Views:

  • Catalina
  • Pacific
  • Cliffs and Canyons

Property site

7 Tips for a Profitable Home Closing

Palos Verdes Real Estate Pro’s latest real estate tip:
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You want to be sure you’re walking away with all the money you’re entitled to from the sale of your home. You’re so close to the sale of your home and ready to move to your new home and you may think there’s nothing left for you to do. However, it is easy to waste a few dollars here and for mistakes to creep into your closing documents there, all adding up to lost profits. For more information, click here.